he concept of my fine art photography work is based on a convergence between photography as a medium and an artistic expression of surrealism as the final outcome. My goal is to achieve an amalgamation of technological art and pictorial visualization of imaginary abstract and fantastical worlds that will trigger strong emotional reactions from the audience, inviting them to use their own imagination as a means of interpreting my work.
My inspiration comes from the work of an eclectic array of artists and photographers, such as the black and white landscapes of Ansel Adams, the serene long exposures of photographer David Burdney; the imaginary worlds from the photo compositions of Jim Kazanjian; the abstract paintings of the Mexican Painter Leonardo Nierman and finally the Fine Art black and white photographs of Cole Thompson.
My photography is a hybrid of reality and fantasy incorporating movement, speed, inertia, giddiness, musicality, softness, beauty, visual texture, translucency, transparency, brightness, opacity, focal blur, colorful, and light itself.
Technically the birth of my creations starts by abstracting an object or a scene through the lens of my camera; this is where my vision starts taking shape. I know at that point what the final piece is going to look. I’ve made the conscious creative and conceptual decisions of composition, focal length, exposure, focus and depth of field. It is later in my studio in front of my computer that I expand on my concept working in the digital darkroom of postproduction where the final image is developed.
I often use the camera as if it was a spatula or squeegee, with gestures, for “muddying the time” or “spread” color with movement. On other occasions, I hold to “draw.” One could say that my work may be considered “Photogenic Painting” made with my “Camera Brush.” The quality of my work is more akin to the plastic arts, with reproduction and representation of reality with all its details. The function of photography as a social document, or as applied Photography, does not apply here; my abstract work can be considered anti-photographic.

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